Sun Conure as Pets (Pros & Cons)


Sun Conures perform best when fed a diet consisting of pellets as well as fresh fruits and vegetables. Be mindful that as they age, they develop a possessive and guarded attitude toward the one they own.

Note that while parrots may be domesticated and form strong bonds with humans via the use of imprinting and operant training, parrots are, by definition, wild animals (unlike dogs who have been bred by people and tamed by people for thousands of generations)

To be suitable as pets, parrots of any kind, including sun conures, need a significant amount of training in addition to constant care because of their unpredictability.

Remember that in order to maintain mental and emotional well-being, your sun conure will need at least one hour each day of genuine personal contact and interaction with you.

The keeping of birds is a way of life. It will completely transform your life. If you are up to the effort, it is gorgeous to look at, but it takes a lot of time.

When you have a new bird, you should always learn as much as you can about that particular species first. Before you welcome the bird into your life, you should make sure you have as much information on it as you possibly can get your hands on. Because I’ve had experience with more than 10 of these birds, I’m going to share what I know about sun conures.

Pros

  • They have a high IQ and are able to communicate. Their level of intellect is equivalent to that of a 7-year-old. Therefore, in that regard, they are brats as well, haha.
  • They are affectionate and energetic pets. I really like hanging out with these guys since they are so easygoing and pleasant.

Cons

  • They are the loudest decimal scream in all the parrot species. It is quite Loud!!! Extremely Loud and Penetrating! So, if you are in a Condo or Apt, forget it. In spite of their little stature, sun conures are known for their loud voices. It’s possible that you won’t have enough space for this bird if you live in an apartment… unless your walls are really thick or your neighbors are unable to hear the noise.
  • They are not family parrots and will choose one owner as their primary caregiver.
  • They are kind while they are young, but as they get older, particularly as they reach adolescence, they often go through various episodes of hostility (2-3years old).
  • They have a tendency to be bossy and irritable at times. They are notorious for nipping when they are in a bad temper. In connection with this topic, you should be aware that owning a parrot makes it certain that you will get bitten at some point in time. Hard. With blood. No matter how close you are to the parrot, it is going to happen anyhow, therefore you should get yourself ready for it. It won’t signify that his or her feelings for you have changed in any way. Do yourself a favor and research the factors that contribute to bird bites.
  • You will need to determine whether or not you have enough spare time for a parrot. They are picky little animals, and you will need to give them at least four hours a day of attention and time out of their cage in order to keep them happy and healthy. You will also need to teach them the control command “step up” as well as the meaning of the word “no.” Taking care of a parrot requires dedication. Be confident you can accomplish it.
  • Check that you have enough money to cover all of his or your requirements. Don’t scrimp. Be prepared for the possibility that the parrot may get unwell by ensuring that you have enough money to pay for veterinary care and that there is an experienced avian veterinarian in your neighborhood.
  • To keep a sun conure content, you will need to provide a pretty spacious cage as well as a variety of toys for it.

Pellets and fresh meals that are safe for birds should be the foundation of a sun conure’s diet for optimal health. One or two millet sprays or a few Nutriberries once a week should be the maximum amount of seed that he or she should get. Seeds should only be given to the animal as a reward.

If you discover that you are able to provide for the requirements of this bird, then I wish you the very best of success! I hope that you have a wonderful time with your new pet.

How Can I Determine the Gender of a Sun Conure?

To the best of my knowledge, sun conures do not exhibit sexual dimorphism in their physical appearance. This indicates that you cannot determine a person’s sexual orientation just by looking at them. To answer that question, you would need to do a DNA test. This test will typically cost around $60. You won’t be able to determine the gender of a Sun Conure until it reaches maturity, at which point it will either attempt to make love to your hand or construct a nest. DNA testing may now be used to determine a person’s sexual orientation, however, the results are not always reliable. If you wanted their DNA I go to Avian Biotech it is only $ 20.00.

How Can I Tell How Old My Sun Conure Is?

The proprietor of the store where I purchase all of my birds know when they were hatched, from which breeder, and so on. Numerous locations maintain such records, and if the animal is banded (though not all states mandate banding and it depends on the breeder), the band may provide this information.

Where to Get a Sun Conure?

I would find an avian veterinarian in your area and ask for the name of a breeder. Also, there are bird shows where you can meet with breeders and purchase a baby.

Petsmart… eh… Buying a bird from any type of pet shop is something you should never do in my opinion. If the personnel seemed competent and not like they were simply making something up to get you to buy the parrot, if the cage was clean, and if the parrot appeared to be happy, then you should go ahead and buy the parrot. If this is not the case, you would be doing the local population of parrots a favor by just leaving the area. You don’t want to pay them money for mistreating animals because even though you “saved” that one, another will take its place, and the firm won’t learn its lesson. You don’t want to give them money because even though you “saved” that one, another will take its place. Just remember that moving forward.

EDIT:

Because they are “angry” about losing money, some breeders and tiny pet businesses may advise you not to buy from Petsmart or PetCo, but this is not the case for all of them. It makes me happy to hear that the Petsmarts and PetCos in your neighborhood are properly maintained; yet, have you ever gone into a store where the circumstances the animals were kept in were truly appalling? I have. I’ve gone to a variety of pet businesses, and many of them have animals who are obviously ill and aren’t given enough care, but the store’s owner, management, or staff don’t give a damn about it. The PetCo just to my north is a filthy place. The PetCo that is located to my west is fantastic.

It’s different with each shop you go to. There are some that are truly great, while others are absolutely terrible. One may be confident that their parrot has been properly cared for, is healthy, and as a consequence is probably happy if they go to a breeder that has a good reputation in the industry.

In addition, when you buy a bird from a store like Petsmart or PetCo, you will almost always pay a lot more money for the bird than you would if you went to a respected breeder to make the purchase. This, too, will differ depending on the region as well as the breeder.

It’s possible that the pet shops in your neighborhood are the best location to look for what you need. That is just not the case in a great number of different contexts.

Do You Have to Take the Male Out of the Cage When the Babies Hatch if You Are Breeding Sun Conures?

I have two male birds in the cage, both of different species (a male quaker and a male blue crown conure). Do I need to separate the eggs and the males, or can I just leave them alone since they aren’t fighting and both are taking care of the female (one goes into the nesting cage and sits on the eggs with the female while the other guards the cage)? How do I know which one is the father? And when is the best time to put one of the males back in the cage after I take him out?

Please help me as soon as you can. Any day now, they’re going to hatch.

The eggs will not be viable since the female bird would not have been able to mate with either of the male birds if there are three distinct types of birds in the cage. There is no chance that the eggs will hatch. Just give her as much time as she wants to sit on them before getting rid of them completely. Also, as soon as all of the eggs have been consumed, dispose of the nesting box. Egg-laying puts a load on her health, and she certainly does not need a box in there to encourage her to continue producing eggs that are not viable. Just ignore them and leave them alone until you notice them really beginning to fight with one another in which case you should step in. If this is the case, you will need to make other plans.

Is It Okay to Have a Baby Chihuahua Around a Sun Conure?

Sure, as long as the dog doesn’t get bitten by the bird.

Because sun conures are such charming and sociable birds, it’s possible that the two of them may become close friends. I would ease them into the conversation.

Considering the fact that you had your sun conure first, the sun conure could—I’m not going to say ‘will,’ but might get envious.

Your dog is about the size of a bird. However, as you are well aware, birds may induce server bites.

  • Maintain constant proximity to them.
  • Do not allow them to go out of your sight in any way.
  • When they are together, allow the bird and the dog to smell each other so that they may get familiar with their respective odors.
  • And if you observe things that might create difficulties, as you know, you should utter a resounding “no” and include the name of either your dog or your bird in the phrase. Pets need to learn how to get along with others and recognize the difference between right and wrong.

I have a friend who has a quaker who gets along well with her two chihuahuas, and I have another friend who has five chihuahuas and she has two sun conures, but you have to train them not to eat roommates. Both of these friends have pets who get along well with each other’s housemates. My quaker and my chihuahua get along quite well with one another.

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