Rare Budgerigar Varieties – The Clear Body


Since the beginning of my involvement with the hobby of collecting Budgerigars in the early 1970s, I was aware of the American mutation known as the Clearbody. The late Cein Roberts, who lived in Lancing, Sussex, was aware of the variety and had begun the process of bringing some of it into the United Kingdom; however, this endeavor was never completed. The futuristic artist’s impression that R. A. Vowles created was the one that came closest to describing the variation. It was published in the book Exhibition Budgerigars written by Dr. M. D. S. Armour. Laced Yellow was the name that Dr. Armour gave to his forecast for the appearance of a new type that would have a transparent body, typical markings on the wings, and a black tail.

In the early 1950s, the Clearbody was first introduced in the United States. In the beginning, there were three distinct kinds of Clearbodies, but one of them, the Terraneo Clearbody, no longer appears to exist. The other two are the Texas Clearbody and the Easley Clearbody. The Texas Clearbody gets its name from the state of Texas, where it was first developed, while the Easley Clearbody gets its name from the state of California, where it was first developed by C. F. Easley. Both in terms of appearance and the way they reproduce, the two types are distinct from one another.

In 1994, while I was on a speaking and judging tour in Australia with the late Mick Wheeler, I came across the Australian version of the Clearbody in Sydney. According to the people who worked there, the establishment has been operating continuously since the early 1950s. An illustration of how a mutation has the potential to show up in different regions of the world at roughly the same time is presented here. The name “Greywing Dilute” was given to the variant that was sold in Australia. Because the Greywing variety is dominant over the Dilute (Yellows and Whites), despite the fact that both types are recessive, I found it difficult to accept this classification. Since both varieties are recessive, this means that a Greywing cannot be masking a Dilute but can be split for it.

The Texas Clearbody is the more prevalent of the two and was initially brought to the UK by Jeff Attwood in 1989. It was afterwards brought to Europe. In 1997, the Budgerigar Society established a provisional color standard for use with this type. The overall look of this green and blue type is rather like to that of normal, although it does differ in the ways that are described below. The flight feathers are a light gray color rather than black, and the body color is suffused rather than solid. The strength of the body color can range from absolutely none at all to about half of the regular body color depth, and it gets more intense as one moves downwards and towards the rump area.

The breeding inheritance of the Texas Clearbody is sex-linked recessive, but it has an interesting relationship when paired to Ino (Lutino and Albino) in that it was discovered to operate as dominant in those situations. Because of this relationship, an Ino cannot be used to mask a Clearbody in the same way that it can be used to mask other types. Additionally, a normal cannot be split for both Clearbody and Ino, although a Clearbody can be split for Ino.

Because of this connection, there are a variety of possible matings that, depending on which partner is utilized, can result in the birth of a Clearbody. This permutation is broken down in the table that follows. For the sake of simplicity, when you see the phrase “Clearbody” used in this table, what it refers to is the Texas sex-linked variety:

No.PairingExpectation
1Ino cock × Clearbody hen50% Clearbody/Ino cocks
50% Ino hens
2Clearbody cock × Ino hen50% Clearbody/Ino cocks
50% Clearbody hens
3Clearbody/Ino cock × Ino hen25% Clearbody/Ino cocks
25% Ino cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Ino hens
4Clearbody/Ino cock × Clearbody hen25% Clearbody cocks
25% Clearbody/Ino cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Ino hens
5Normal/Clearbody cock × Ino hen25% Normal/Clearbody cocks
25% Normal/Ino cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Normal hens
6Clearbody cock × Normal hen50% Normal/Clearbody cocks
50% Clearbody hens
7Clearbody/Ino cock × Normal hen25% Normal/Clearbody cocks
25% Normal/Ino cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Ino hens
8Normal/Clearbody cock × Clearbody hen25% Normal/Clearbody cocks
25% Clearbody cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Normal hens
9Normal/Clearbody cock × Normal hen25% Normal/Clearbody cocks
25% Normal cocks
25% Clearbody hens
25% Normal hens
10Normal cock × Clearbody hen50% Normal/Clearbody cocks
> 50% Normal hens
11Clearbody cock × Clearbody hen50% Clearbody cocks
50% Clearbody hens

It is important to be aware of the fact that all Normals and split cocks for either Clearbody or Ino cannot be differentiated from one another, and that their identities can only be determined by test mating. The utilization of the Ino in the aforementioned matings causes the body color to become lighter, while the Normals contribute additional size as well as head characteristics that are desirable for a show specimen.

At the All American Show in San Diego in 1998, I had the pleasure of meeting Tom Easley, and we had a very lengthy conversation about the variety that had been founded by his father more than forty years earlier. It was a memorable experience for me. Mr. Easley did tell me that the current Easley Clearbody was not at all like the mutation that his father had originally developed. Due to the presence of an excessive amount of black melanin, the modern Easley Clearbody, which is also known as the Laced Clearbody on occasion, typically has wing markings, flight feathers, tail feathers, and mask patches that are jet black in color. Regardless of the color of the rest of their body, their cheek patches are a shade of gray or silver. Additionally, the body color has been seen to have less suffusion, which is a trait that is associated with the Texas mutation. Having said that, Tom Easley did mention that the original stock’s cheek patches were a light violet color.

A recent issue of the magazine Rare Variety & Colour BS has an article written by Ken Gray about the Easley Clearbody. The late C. F. Easley wrote a letter to the late Cyril Rogers that provided comprehensive information about this variety. This letter served as the basis for the article. Mr. Easley characterized the first Easley Clearbody, which he discovered in his aviary in January 1954 as an Opaline Greywing Dark Green hen with a yellow body color. He termed this bird the “Easley Clearbody.” That bird’s biological father was an Opaline Dark Green cock, and its mother was a Cobalt hen. The following year, same hen was coupled with a regular Dark Green cock, which resulted in the birth of two further examples of this novel mutation: both cocks, one normal and one opaline. Both matched the description given of an Easley Clearbody, with the exception that their cheek patches were a light violet color.

Mr. Easley found out that the variety has a dominant breeding pattern and that it is possible to create offspring of either gender from any mating in which at least one of the partners must be able to see each other. Due to the presence of the gene that acts as a dominant factor, the variety can be established in either a single or double factor. The double factor variation typically has a body color that is significantly toned down. Despite the fact that I have saw examples of this variety in both the United States and Europe, the variety has not yet been brought into the United Kingdom.

🦜🦜 Click Images Below To Explore More Popular Bird Supplies on Amazon!! 🦜🦜

Recent Posts

link to Cleaning

Cleaning

Indeed, we must use extreme caution… Using any one of a number of products that are easily accessible, cages can be cleaned without risk. Poop Off(tm) and California Cage Cleaner are both excellent...

Losing track of your pet bird's growth? Check Out Our BEST SELLING Pet Bird Growth Logbook!

You can Sign up for a FREE Instant Download Teaser NOW!