Care Feeding


Congratulations on acquiring a Parrotlet! The following information is given for your convenience, and it is hoped that it will answer many of your questions concerning your new pet.

Health GuaranteeGeneral
 Info
HousingTravelCage 
Location
DietCleaningBathingCareHazards
SafetyPublicationsRoutineToysDisclaimer

Health Guarantee

Parrot-lets & More ensures that the bird(s) is/are healthy and disease-free at the time of purchase. If the bird(s) becomes sick or dies within 72 hours of purchase and is found to have been unwell upon arrival by the buyer’s avian veterinarian, the customer must return the bird(s) and choose between a refund and a new bird(s) of similar value.

A licenced Avian Veterinarian has done a “Well Baby Check” on the bird(s), which includes a physical exam, weight check, gramme stain, and Polyoma immunisation (s). To the best of our knowledge, the bird(s) are Megabacteriosis-free. I still recommend that the buyer have the bird(s) examined for this pathogen during the post-purchase checkup, in addition to other normal preventative health screenings performed by a trained avian veterinarian.

The bird(s) in question are hand-fed young Parrotlets. To guarantee a happy and well-adjusted pet, much effort and many hours have been devoted in its care, development, and taming. However, since parrotlets are not tamed animals, there is no assurance of temperament or personality. Prior to purchasing, the customer is required to touch and study the bird(s).

If, for any reason, you are unable to provide the above bird(s) a home in the future, as long as said bird(s) is healthy, I will happily accept the bird(s) back as long as the baby leg band(s) have not been removed.

General Information

The parrotlet you bought is from the Forpus family. These are some of the world’s tiniest genuine parrots. Pacific, Greenrump, Blue Wing, Mexican, Spectacled, Sclater’s, and Yellow Face are the seven species. At the moment, only the Pacific, Greenrump, and Spectacled are offered to the pet trade. The Mexican, Blue Wing, and Yellow Face are solely accessible to breeders in the United States. The Sclater’s is not yet accessible in the United States and may never be due to severe import rules.

In terms of attitude and appetite, parrotlets are closely linked to Amazon parrots. When maintained as solitary pets with love, training, and care, they often learn to communicate. They are quiet birds with a lovely chirping sound. Parrotlets may be found from Mexico through Central America and all the way down to the Amazon basin. They are very active birds with a strong metabolism and intellect.

Housing

Parrotlets need a lot of space as well as a lot of toys to keep them engaged. Keep your new pet in a cage that is at least 18″ by 18″ in size. The cage bars should be tightly spaced so that the wings and head do not get entangled. Two perches, one high at the rear of the cage (tail should not contact bars when the bird spins around) and one low near the food and water bowls. No hooded food or water cups; parrotlets will refuse to eat from them and will starve if the cups are not open.

The cage should feature a detachable tray and a bottom grate. This keeps your pet out of the dirt and makes cage cleaning easy. I strongly advise you to get a cage with at least two feeding stations, preferably three, and a huge door opening.

Toys

Swings are popular, and many parrotlets like to sleep on them at night. Because they like chewing, wooden toys designed for parakeets to cockatiels are ideal. Plastic products do not survive long and may be consumed in little quantities. Non-toxic dyes should be used on coloured timbers. Thin strips of vegetable tanned leather embellished with little coloured plastic beads are popular. Ladders are fantastic for climbing.

Many parrotlets like looking in mirrors, but I choose not to provide them since I believe a single pet will not increase his speaking skills. They will chirp and converse to the mirror, and the mirror image will become their partner, and once they have a mate, they won’t need you as a buddy.

There are plenty more excellent toys available; however, while choosing toys, keep your pet’s safety in mind. My birds all like slinkies and tiny “C” rings, both of which are made of hard plastic and are quite safe. I’ve found rope and string toys to be really harmful. If you like, you can even build your own toys.

Cage Location

Place your cage in a calm spot of a crowded room. Direct sunlight and draughts should be avoided. Every evening, cover the cage to offer security to your pet’s habit.

Bring a new bird home first thing in the morning on a day when you will be home to study its behaviour. As soon as you get home, put the bird in the cage. After it has explored and seems to be at ease, you may take the bird outside and touch and speak to it for a brief length of time, taking care not to tyre it out.

Before you put the bird to bed for the night, ensure sure it has access to food and water. To make the transition easier, give it the same items it has been consuming. Wait until your new pet has accustomed to its new home and to you before changing the food.

Diet

Your parrotlet was handfed Tropicana handfeeding formula by Hagen before being weaned on a 50% deluxe Finch and 50% Sun Seed Vita Cockatiel seed, as well as LaFaber and Tropicana pellets. Corn on the cob, broccoli, squash, carrots, peas, green beans, and sprouts are examples of vegetables. They also had simple spaghetti, brown grains, soaking beans, and a birdie bread I made for them. Cheerios, spray millet (no more than 1″ per day), cuddlebone, and mineral block were all available.

Experiment till you find out what foods your bird enjoys, but don’t give the same items every day; birds, like you, need a variety of fruits and vegetables as well as other meals. Avocado, Chocolate, and Raw Soybeans should not be fed since they are harmful. Alcohol, Coke, Sugar, Salt, and Coffee are also harmful to your new companion. A well-balanced meal that is beneficial for you will also be good for your parrotlet.

At all times, fresh water, seed, and pellets should be provided in the cage. Fruits and vegetables, as well as bean mixtures, should be removed after a few hours since they deteriorate fast. Food and water dishes should not be closed or hooded. Parrotlets may not utilise them and may be hungry in only 24 hours. Make certain that your bird is eating every day. Do not wait until your bird is sitting on the cage floor to see that it hasn’t eaten or drunk water. You’d be shocked at how much your tiny bundle of feathers can consume!

Cleaning

Wash and disinfect the water dishes on a weekly or more frequent basis. Bacteria may multiply swiftly. Every day, I wash all food and water dishes, clean the cage tray, and replace the cage papers. Weekly, I clean the food and water dishes, as well as the cage tray. I too prefer to use water bottles for my birds, but I keep the water dish until I am certain that they are utilising the bottles before I remove it. I discovered that if I change the water in their bowls in the early morning when I feed them, many of them instantly begin to play in the water, and many will form what I call soup in their water. It upset me to think that the drinking water had been contaminated all day, so I changed it twice a day. My issue was cured when I switched to water bottles.

I clean the whole cage with soap and water once a month, disinfect it, then let it air dry outdoors in the sun.

Bathing

When it comes to bathing, each bird is unique. Some will bathe in their drinking water, while others will roll about in wet lettuce leaves put on the bottom of their cages, and yet others may like to be sprayed with slightly warm water from a plant mister. My kids even take baths in their water bottles. Make sure the bird is not in a chilly place during bathing. If you have some control over your bathing, showering in the morning is advised.

Care

Parrotlets often just need intermittent nail clipping. This may be done in your veterinarian’s office or at home. A lava rock perch will assist in keeping the nails clipped. Overgrown beaks are very common in greenrumps. A little piece of untreated soft wood placed near a rear perch can help keep the beak trimmed. If you see that the nails and beak need to be trimmed, you should have a Vet instruct you how to do it the first time.

Even having their wings removed, parrotlets fly well. You should anticipate your bird to moult once every 4-6 months, and once every 12 months. After each moult, re-clip the flying feathers. Please keep in mind that they can fly with their wings cut. During moults, give your pet vitamins dusted over soft foods, never in water. Nekton Tonic-K is readily accessible and effective in stressful situations. At the first indication of new pinfeathers or stress, increase the bird’s nutrition.

Hazards

If your pet is not in its cage, it may come seeking for you, so be careful where you tread. Allow your pet to stay out of the kitchen since overheated nonstick cookware generates toxic gases that may harm your bird even if it is in another room. Stoves may be lethal. Avoid using strong scented candles, bathroom sprays, or incense.

Close toilet basins and prevent standing water or full sinks. Houseplants should be kept away until you are certain they are safe. Irons and ironing boards should be kept in a separate room. Fans are also quite hazardous to your small companion. If you take your bird outdoors, please keep it in a cage.

Parrotlets are very territorial and should not be allowed to leave their cage when other birds are playing. Their stature does not represent their capacity to harass; they will often terrify a very huge bird.

Safety

If your pet is not in its cage, it may come seeking for you, so be careful where you tread. Allow your pet to stay out of the kitchen since overheated nonstick cookware generates toxic gases that may harm your bird even if it is in another room. Stoves may be lethal. Avoid using strong scented candles, bathroom sprays, or incense.

Close toilet basins and prevent standing water or full sinks. Houseplants should be kept away until you are certain they are safe. Irons and ironing boards should be kept in a separate room. Fans are also quite hazardous to your small companion. If you take your bird outdoors, please keep it in a cage.

Parrotlets are very territorial and should not be allowed to leave their cage when other birds are playing. Their stature does not represent their capacity to harass; they will often terrify a very huge bird.

Traveling

A young bird (3-6 months) is more prone than an older bird to develop agitated when travelling. Begin with short excursions; covering the cage with a towel while travelling might help your bird remain calm. When travelling, apple and orange slices should be put in the cage, as well as seed and pellets. When you pause for a respite, provide water, and remove any dangling toys before you begin your journey. For protection, I like to transport my birds in tiny travelling cages. Leave them out of direct sunlight or in a hot automobile.

Routine

All caged birds rely on regularity to feel comfortable, and security minimises the amount of stress they are subjected to. Pay close attention to your pet’s look in the morning and before going to bed. The eyes should be brilliant; the crop is full, and the feathers are kept close to the body. Is your pet “chatting” with you? A puffed-up bird with a bowed head and closed eyes is most likely sick. Do not wait for it to get better; instead, see an avian veterinarian before a catastrophe occurs. Take an ailing bird to the veterinarian as soon as you suspect anything is amiss.

My birds even criticise me if I’m late feeding them; it’s amazing how they respond to any deviation in routine.

🦜🦜 Click Images Below To Explore More Popular Bird Supplies on Amazon!! 🦜🦜

Recent Posts

Losing track of your pet bird's growth? Check Out Our BEST SELLING Pet Bird Growth Logbook!

You can Sign up for a FREE Instant Download Teaser NOW! 

error: Content is protected !!