Budgerigar Breeding Tips (Q&A by Experts)


Breeders from all over the globe made a request for this Q&A. Please don’t hesitate to ask whatever you want to know about your budgerigar if you have any queries(s). We are aware that there may be moments when you will be at a loss for words on what to do or even what is wrong with your birds. Please make use of the contact form to get in touch with us if you have any inquiries or concerns.

HOW DO YOU BRING YOUR HENS INTO BREEDING CONDITIONS – ESPECIALLY IF THE CERE IS BLUISH?

At least one month prior to setting up my breeder pairs. I separate my cocks and hens into separate side-by-side flights. This enables you to watch and know which of your birds are in true breeding condition. At this time, I put freshly cut eucalyptus branches in the flights for the birds to chew on. Be sure this is thoroughly washed, making sure there is no wild bird dropping on the branches. This usually primes them pretty well! As far as the bluish cere goes, some hens never do get chestnut brown. When I set up my hens, I usually like the cere to be whitish with the light brown just starting on the cere – in other words, the hen is just coming into proper breeding condition. You do not want her at her peak and starting down when you set her up.

Answered By Don Denny, Champion Breeder, judge, and chairman of the Judge’s Committee of the American Budgerigar Society


WHEN THE COCK IN FEEDING A CLUTCH OF CHICKS BECOMES ILL, WHAT SHOULD BE DONE?

I immediately would foster out the chicks to other nests that are in the same timing sequence as this clutch. Try not to have more than four chicks per clutch. Again, you must know your birds and how well they feed. I would immediately isolate the cock bird and diagnose his problem and treat it accordingly. Also, you want to watch the hen as the cock also feeds the hen and could have communicated the problem to her.

Answered By Don Denny, Champion Breeder, judge, and chairman of the Judge’s Committee of the American Budgerigar Society


I HAVE NOTICED THAT MY HENS SELDOM, IF EVER, COME DOWN TO EAT WHEN THE CHICKS ARE BEING FED. IS THIS NORMAL?

Yes, this is normal. When your chicks reach the age of 21 days, the hen generally does not help in the feeding of the young. So the cock is feeding the chicks and the hen. That is why I usually pull the hen and put her back on the flight when the youngest chick is 21 days old. In this way, the cock doesn’t usually get fired up to breed with the hen and possibly do damage to or kill the chicks. I also can determine if the babies are as good as I expected this mating to produce. If they are, I can set the mating again. If not, I introduce another hen or possibly a whole new mating.

Answered By Don Denny, Champion Breeder, judge, and chairman of the Judge’s Committee of the American Budgerigar Society


WHY DO ADULTS KILL BABIES IN THE NEST? WHAT DO YOU DO ABOUT IT?

There are many, many reasons why this can happen. I will list a few: improper diet, running out of feed or water, illness, too much protein in the diet making the cock bird only want to breed and not raise, and disturbances in the breeding room at night, such as mice. I would try to correct whatever I felt was the problem, and maybe not let this pair raise again depending on who I felt was the culprit.

Answered By Don Denny, Champion Breeder, judge, and chairman of the Judge’s Committee of the American Budgerigar Society


WHY WOULD A COCK OR HEN EAT EGGS AS THEY ARE LAID? WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP THIS?

When I have a pair of birds doing this, it is generally the hen. So every time she eats an egg, I add two more to the nest, and these are old rotten eggs that were clear from other matings.

Answered By Don Denny, Champion Breeder, judge, and chairman of the Judge’s Committee of the American Budgerigar Society

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